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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 112 (some duplicates have been removed)
stood here as your new governor wisconsin was facing a $3.6 billion budget deficit. property taxes had gone up 27% over the previous decade, increasing every year and the unemployment rate was 7.8%. today wisconsin has a $34 million surplus. property taxes on median value home went down each. last two years the unemployment rate, well, it is down to 6.7%. [applause] we're turning things around. we're heading in the right direction. we're moving wisconsin forward. and unlike other states we avoided significant tax increases, massive layoffs and cuts in programs like medicaid. instead we put in place long-term structural reforms that helped us balance state and local government budgets for years to come. what we did was think more about the next generation than we did about the next election and it worked. but the first time in our state's history we set machine any aside in two consecutive years for the rainy day fund. our bond rating is solid and our pension system is the only one in the country that is fully funded. [applause] we made tough but prudent decisions to get our fiscal hous
the deficit will grow the economy. they quantified that, it will really happen. look a chart showing three different scenarios that could happen. if we add to the deficit we'll see a bump in gross national product in the short-term but the economy could take a major hit in the long run. if we cut the deficit we see a major bump 10 years, down the road. look at that even though the economy will take a hit in the short term. when it comes to the deficit, shouldn't we focus on the long game here i'm wondering? here with more is former director of the congressional budget office, douglas holtz-eakin. thanks so much for joining us. >> thank you. melissa: i was so excited the cbo finally went out and quantified this and tried to illustrate it to people. anytime you try to make the case we should cut spending short term to help our children down the road or ourselves depending how long you are, people poo-poo that is not like real math s that real math we saw on the bar charts? >> that is real math and the second example of that real math is what the cbo put out which says, suppose you do nothing
money to reduce the deficit and will likely focus on a familiar target. white house correspondent wendell goaler tells us how that is going over. >> as the president headed to minnesota to talk about gun violence, republicans on capitol hill tried to keep the nation's attention on fiscal matters. >> we are having trouble in large part because spending is a problem. it is what is chasing jobs overseas and causing much anxiety about our future. >> sunday in a presuper bowl interview with cbs's scott kelly mr. obama said this year's changes shouldn't be the last. >> there is no doubt we need additional revenue coupled with smart spending reductions in order to bring down the deficit. he is not talking raising rates but closing loopholes especially those making money from investment pay a lower tax rate than income salaried or hourly wage earn ers. >> the average person doesn't have access to cayman island reports. they don't have access to interest income where they pay a much lower rate on billions of dollars they have earned. >> mr. obama says the only way to continue investing in
economy back to work and create jobs, jobs, jobs. that's what this is about. our deficit has been coming down and the patient approach is to recognize that we actually have time. we should bring the deficit down, but we have time. we should take the cuts off the table and think about how to get the economy going. if people work again, we are on the road to solving the problem. >> to that point and looking at the cuts you have been pointing out to head start and cuts to wic, the women, infant and children nutritional assistant program, they are penny wise and foolish and may be making things worse in the long run. >> i'm glad you raised that, crystal. if you think about the single mom working 12 hours a day and her paycheck does not take her to the end of the month on food. what she realizes and has been a responsible mom, but realizes after she makes the decision to have her child not have an abortion is that her paycheck is not going to help her feed her infant. the women infant children program not only feeds these families, it also teaches them about nutrition and how to be healther a
to the well again. the president insists he needs more money to reduce the deficit and will likely focus on a familiar target. white house correspondent wendell goaler tells us how that is going over. >> as the president headed to minnesota to talk about gun violence, republicans on capitol hill tried to keep the nation's attention on fiscal matters. >> we are having trouble in large part because spending is a problem. it is what is chasing jobs overseas and causing much anxiety about our future. >> sunday in a presuper bowl interview with cbs's scott kelly mr. obama said this year's tax changes shouldn't be the last. >> there is no doubt we need additional revenue coupled with smart spending reductions in order to bring down the deficit. he is not talking raising rates but closing loopholes especially those making money from investment pay a lower tax rate than income salaried or hourly wage earn ers. >> the average person doesn't have access to cayman island reports. they don't have access to interest income where they pay a much lower rate on billions of dollars they have earned. >> m
's transparent and that we're reducing our deficit in a way that doesn't hamper growth. >> reporter: the response from house speaker john boehner's office? the president got his revenue, now it's finally time to make the reforms necessary to save our entitlement programs. any tax loopholes we close should be used to lower rates for all taxpayers so we can be more competitive and create or more jobs. automatic spending cuts hit the federal budget march 1st. less than four weeks later, a large portion of federal spending authority expires. if democrats and republicans fail to resolve these tax and spending differences, the government is headed for those across the board spending cuts and a government shutdown. back to you. connell: rich, thank you very much. rich edson in d.c. dagen: let's bring in david stockman, former economic adviser to president ronald reagan. there's no urgency though. if we don't do something about our annual budget deficits and our longer term debt that we're accumulating, is it just going to be kind of a slow drip like where we bleed to death as a nation, where we don't re
with some of my republican friends is that we'rewe all want to fix the deficit problem. there is no question. but i think, when they have a chance to look at this bill and understand what we're really facing, i don't think we will have a problem. >> how is this different from the proposal from a year ago? >> did we have a pay freeze a year ago? [laughter] >> it is different. the house had the attrition of the workforce that is in this component. we had a combination -- instead of every three positions that came open. we had two. and a combination of overall across the federal government over a year. this is different here it combines both so we're on the same page. and we have the house proposal on nutrition and we added congressional pay freeze on it. >> what makes you think this time around that the senate majority leader will take up this proposal? >> i would certainly defer to the chairman, but there is a real urgency here. one of the reasons that the president and the administration, during this campaign, didn't want the actual warrant act, the law that requires to notify workers that t
that we need higher fuel tax, and we can use that either to reduce the deficit or to pay for something else. it was designed -- or intended -- whether it has done so successfully or not, it was done to pay for infrastructure. >> absolutely. we are not real happy about that. >> john, what are you hoping for next week? >> for some reason, i have not been consulted on that. the president in the campaign said he was 4 and all of the above energy policy, so let's have some announcements that support that -- he was for an " all of the above" energy policy. let's move forward with the things that you need to do to accomplish that policy. i would say that we would also -- i would like to see stop this discussion about taxing the industry and trying to characterize it as subsidies, which is simply not true, and i would like to see more opportunities in terms of where we can open up areas that are off-limits right now. all those combined can generate an enormous amount of opportunity for the economy right when we need it. >> i will just mention a couple of things. i think lenders have been reall
advising, we can replace the sequester with a smarter strategy that is a more gradual deficit reduction plan. he's going disagree with the republicans on how to do that. he's going to want revenue to be part of it. republicans will say no thank you. >> we'll get the president if a minute and a half. white house gave us a two-minute warning. i would say it's a short-term for the president and the congress not doing what they're supposed to do pass a budget every year. the president set up the sequester, a fiscal negotiations -- >> this is not a natural disaster. >> it's not a natural disaster. >> man-made. >> many ways the president's late submitting his own budget but coming to the podium because though he's part of the mess he thinks he has the upper hand. >> right. i'm having a world is upside down moment. when you talk to house republicans they say to you, you know what? this may be the best budget cuts we can get. let the sequester take effect, even if it cuts the military, the secretary and defense, leon panetta saying that would be shameful. but you have a lot of house republicans
await final action on deficit reductions. well, the best way to reduce deficits is through economic growth. [ applause ] get ready for a lot more of that new-plane smell. we're building the youngest, most modern fleet among the largest us airlines to ensure that you are more comfortable and connected than ever. we are becoming a new american. barrow island has got rare kangaroos. ♪ chevron has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> welcome back to "the kudlow report." in this half hour, mahmoud ahmadinejad says iran is now a nuclear country. does that mean the rogue regime already has nuclear weapons? we'll get an answer later on. on what would have been president reagan's 102nd birthday, we will honor reagan with a look at many of his messages that resonate today. we have more of his best comments for you and we have reagan biographer cr
for a short-term deal to avoid these budget cuts. congress must find $85 billion in deficit reduction somewhere by march 1st. otherwise, pentagon spending would shrink by 7.9%. domestic spending by 5.3% and medicare would take a 2% reduction. the president prefers an option that raises more money by closing tax loopholes. republicans want to stick with spending cuts only. a study by george mason university estimated that 448,000 jobs in d.c., maryland and virginia could be affected by automatic indiscriminate budget cuts. business leaders and local congressmen are concerned about the impact on our economy. >> and sequestration will hurt not only the defense side but the non-defense side. my committee funds the f.b.i. there will probably be furloughs at the f.b.i. there will be furloughs potentially at the national cancer institute, at nih. this thing has ramifications for defense and non-defense. >> reporter: the cuts were originally scheduled to kick in january 1st because congress couldn't grow on a broad package to reduce the deficit several times in 2011 and 2012 in excomping for
apiece saying how the trust deficit is hurting the economy. what are you trying to say about that? guest: we usually do not talk about trust deficits. talk about trade, budget deficits, things we can measure. i'm talking about a breakdown of trust in american society, in particular in the institutions that make our economy go. when you look at measures of trust from surveys like a gallup or the pugh institute -- the pew institute, or even newspapers, congress, large corporations, banks, public schools, they have all been going down for many years. for a lot of them, this decline in trust was intensified leading up to and going into the financial crisis. there are a lot of reasons for these things we can talk about. what we were trying to get at in the story that -- is that this matters to the economy, and trust breaks down. there was nobel prize-winning economist who 40 years ago said that every commercial transaction has within it an element of trust. when you trust your counter party, you're more likely to engage in a transaction. when trust begins to fray, and people become suspicious
with a record debt and deficit, threat of global warming, threat of global poverty, of pandemics, of national security challenges like continuing war on terrorism, the instability of iran and north korea, rising powers, turmoil across the middle east, turmoil in north africa, the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and the growing threat of cyberattacks. how we confront these problems, how we deal with these challenges will in many ways determine that future course of america. it will determine whether the united states will be a leader in the 21st century or whether we will be just another failed empire in history. to succeed we will depend on the resilience of our economy, the strength of our diplomatic and military institutions and above all, the effectiveness of our political system that underpins in many ways what we do as a country. and that brings me to what i see as perhaps the most urgent task facing this nation and facing all of us and that is overcoming the partisan dysfunction in congress that poses a threat to our quality of life, to our national security, to our economy
to reduce a deficit, he said the answer will require sacrifice from everyone. >> well, i don't think the issue right now is raising rates. the question is if we're going to be serious about reducing our deficit, can we combine some smart spending cuts, because there is still some waste in government. can we reform our health care programs in particular, because we spend a lot more on health care than every other country does, and we don't get better outcomes. so there is a lot of waste in the system. and there are things that we can do to reduce health care costs. and can we close some loopholes and deductions that folks who are well connected and have a lot of accountants and can take advantage of, so they end up paying lower rate that's an bus driver or a cop. can we close some of those loop holes? if we combine those things together, then we cannot only reduce our deficit, but we can continue to invest in things like education and research and things that will help us grow. >> meantime, the president leaves washington tomorrow for minnesota to make his case for new gun restriction
, there are good points. for instance, deficits are decreasing. however, all i ever hear from republicans is the president needs to get serious. from speaker john boehner. that's the best impersonation i can give you. >> it's not bad. >> wasn't very good, nothing personal. >> but dana, is that it? >> well, that was a little raspy, your john boehner. but i think you've captured the sentiment, more or less correctly. and yes, the cbo report shows that the deficit is shrinking. but it is also showing the efforts to shrink the deficit have taken away from growth and the economy. you can't have one of these things without the other. now, i think there's a fallacy in the first question you posed to jared. that is that republicans would be very upset if there were a double-dip recession in a political sense as rush limbaugh and others have stated, they may be in a stronger position if the economy goes back into recession. then the president and his majority party will be less powerful. so they actually have a political incentive. >> hang on a second, dana. you're saying something that's troublin
to lower the devers, but americans do not -- to lower the deficit, but americans do not support sacrificing real spenged cuts for more tax hikes. the president's sequester should be replaced with spending cuts and reforms that put us on a path to balance a budget over the next 10 years. the american people believe that the tax question has been settled. they know the president called for a balanced approach to the debt. combination of revenues and spending cuts, and they know he's gotten his revenue. the american people do not believe the president will use further tax revenues to lower the debt. and haven't seen this president attempt to spend his way into prosperity over the last four years, they know he'll spend it. the president doesn't believe we have a spending problem. he general winly believes the government -- genuinely believes the government spending causes economic growth. if that were true, the economy today would be thriving. it isn't thriving. the unemployment rate is still nearly 8% and rising. small businesses like the one i ran are struggling. middle class families, those
times" economist argued why the u.s. should spend now and worry about deficit reduction later. here it is. >> dashing spending when you still have depressed economy is really destructive. it's probably even counterproductive even in purely fiscal terms. we should be sustaining government spending until we have a stronger economic recovery. >> this is not a hard call. as long as we have 4 million people who have been unemployed for more than a year, this is not a time to be worrying about reducing the budget deficit. give me something that looks more like a normal employment situation and i'll become a deficit hawk but not now. >> do you subscribe to that, jared? or is that too extreme? >> not at all. i think paul's exactly right. paul and i share the following thing. we're deficit doves in a down economy, and deficit hawks in a strong economy. at a time like this, what you really need is faster growth. by the way, not only will that help put more people to work, but it will actually help reduce your budget deficit ironically because those people will be working, paying taxes, they w
and uninsured health costs. the shortfall the average savings deficit for a single female is little over $133,000. that's the additional amount a single female would on average need to save by age 65 to eliminate the shortfall. the recent economic crisis has made it even more difficult. the low contribution rates and the lack of understanding of the need for the comprehensive retirement strategy means inadequate income for the rest of your life. these issues are compounded in addition to living longer older women are likely to have costly chronic medical conditions and need longer-term institutional care. further women are likely to be single at some point in their lives which puts them at a high risk for poverty and it is an irony of the latest stage of life many women become poor for the first time in their life. today the rate of harmony for women 65 and over is close to 11%. in my testimony i have a lot more numbers but what i would like to point out is of those numbers once you get to single women almost a third and for the hispanic women it is 44% which is just the enormous. another twi
, he talked about the economy. when it comes to tackling the nation's deficit, president obama said sunday in an interview with cbs news there needs to be revenue involved. and it sounds like he might be interested in going after people like mitt romney. >> there is no doubt we need additional revenue coupled with smart spending reductions in order to bring down our deficit. and we can do it in a gradual way so that it doesn't have a huge impact. and as i said, when you look at some of these deductions that certain folks are able to take advantage of, the average person can't take advantage of them. the average person doesn't have access to cayman island accounts. the average person doesn't have access to carried interest income where they end up paying a much lower rate on billions of dollars that they've earned. so we just want to make sure that the whole system is fair. >> all right. steve, help me out here. i think the democrats are holding a losing hand if they come back and ask for more taxes. they talk about raising tax rates on anybody. but if we're talking about closing loo
gdp calculation rises, government versus consumption plus investment and minus your trade deficit, right? so if it's not going to consumption and it's going into the pockets of the top 1% or whatever, why aren't we seeing that reflected in investment? in fact, we saw very good business and investment numbers in the latest economic data. where are those dollars disappearing to? >> people invest when there's no return. >> excess capacity, you're not going to build more excess capacity just because the fed has low interest rates. i mean, if you look at investment overall, before the crisis, about 40% of all investment was in real estate. now, that is going to be damp dampened just because we built too many houses. >> and we had a bust, right? >> and we had a bust. the good news was a lot of them were showedly built and they'll fall apart and we'll have to reconstruct them. >> thank heavens. >> but the fact is, we overbuilt. the other part is actually not doing badly, given how weak demand is. it's not a lack of money. it's not the weaknesses in our financial system. that was one of t
out of washington to get our deficits under control. hopefully, we do not have to many quarters where we end up in negative territory. this is not an economy growing six percent and can hinder those bibles easily. host: magnolia, texas, david, better. caller: [indiscernible]we are doing great here. i noticed the super bowl is forming dollars per minute. everything is packed. all of the football stadiums. i do not see any recession. host: you said you are doing better why? caller: i live 15 miles from where they are building the number one country in the world. we are getting roads. it is unbelievable around here. we have job signs everywhere. as far as the savings, when interest rates are 1.5%, who will put their money in the bank? bernanke wants you to put it in stocks. that is why there is no interest rate. i took my money for years ago when i bought those rifles. i have made so much money on them. it is unbelievable. host: he mentioned social security. there is a category about the social safety net. guest: we use the term government social benefits to cover quite a few different p
: the dow hitting 14,000 with nicole on the air. this is a snapshot of just how bad our deficits are going to be over the next ten years. dagen: rich edson is live in washington, d.c. rich: $1.1 trillion, that was our deficit for 2012. this is the most recent projections by the office. this year, a budget deficit -- the decade production was $2.26 trillion. these numbers will be much different. much worse. it must examine the budget as if congress does absolutely nothing. and current policy continues. we have had some changes. mainly that built that passed congress earlier in the year. millions of middle-class americans do not have to pay the amt. it also changed the estate tax bumping down the rate of little bit lower than what it had been over the exception of little bit higher. the numbers we just show you, the real numbers will be much worse. we will find out at 1:00 o'clock. back to you. dagen: are we going to be in a statement from the white house at 1:15 p.m.? rich: he will talk about the sequester. he will push for congress to pass a smaller package of spending cuts and tax reform
. grappling with a record debt and deficits, threat of global warming, threat of global poverty, pandemics, of national security challenges like continuing war on terrorism, instability of iran and north korea, rising powers, turmoil across the middle east, turmoil in north africa, the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, and the growing threat of cyber attacks. how we confront these problems, how we deal with these challenges will in many ways determine the future course of america. it will determine whether the united states will be a leader in the 21st century, or whether we will be just another failed empire in history. to succeed, we will depend on the resilience of our economy, the strength of our diplomatic and military institutions, and above all, the effectiveness of our political system. that underpins in many ways everything we do as a country. and that brings me to what i see as perhaps the most urgent task, facing this nation and facing all of us. and that is overcoming the partisan dysfunction in congress that poses a threat to our quality of life, to our national se
into further deficit and debt. >> obviously democrats would prefer a longer suspension of he debt ceiling which would provide additional economic security and stability as we continue to find ways to decrease the deficit. raising the possibility that the u.s. could default its obligations every few months is not an ideal way to run government but a short term solution is better than another imminent manufactured crisis. >> holman: the house already passed the bill. without it, the government would default on its obligations as early as mid-february. in economic news, americans' personal income grew in december, by the most in eight years. but first-time claims for jobless benefits were up last week. and on wall street today, the dow jones industrial average lost nearly 50 points to close at 13,860. the nasdaq fell a fraction of a point to close at 3,142. blinding snowfall and a slick freeway triggered a mile-long series of crashes in detroit today. at least three people were killed and 20 more injured. the pileups left a section of interstate 75 littered with wrecked cars and big-rig trucks. th
the economy and put us on a sustainable budget, bring our deficits down in a responsible, balanced way. >> does the president -- considering what the defense cuts did to the contraction of the u.s. economy in the fourth quarter, dois the president goi to be more aggressive in trying to find a way to stop the so-called sequester, the automatic defense cuts that would go through, which could it looks like now -- we already know the economic impact defense cuts have had last quarter. these would obviously slow down the economy even more. is the president going to refocus on this. >> the president has been focused on this for some time. the president made a submission to the super committee a year ago or so, which would have reduced our deficits in a balanced way, eliminated the sequester and his negotiations with the congress on the fiscal cliff. he did the same thing. so this is something that the president has provided a plan. the sequester is bad policy. it's something that we should eliminate. it wasn't intended to take place. and we got a taste for the impact that the sequester might
will do more than anything else to shrink the deficit and long-term tax reform, long-term entitlement reform. that's the right way to do it. but to cut now because we want to reform entitlements later doesn't make any sense. >> let me ask about that. you talk about tax reform. that's something the left wants and something the right wants. the problem is with tax reform, what it entails. here's the president today talking about tax reform, closing loopholes. >> there is no reason that the jobs of thousands of americans who work in national security or education or clean energy, not to mention the growth of the entire economy, should be put in jeopardy just because folks in washington couldn't come together to eliminate a few special interest tax loopholes or government programs that we agree need some reform. >> they're not little and they're not few and they're not easy. of the five of the top ten tax expenditures, these are loopholes. mortgage interest deduction, the deduction we get for health care, the child tax credit, deduction for state and local taxes, charity. okay. the presid
references to the trust deficit that has at times existed between this committee and the cia. if i'm confirmed, the address the deficit between the committee and the cia would be wholly unacceptable and i would make it my goal on day one of my tenure and every day thereafter to strengthen the trust between us. i have a reputation for speaking my mind, and at times doing so in a direct manner, which some attribute to my new jersey routes. -- roots. i would like to think that my candor would reassure you that you'll get straight answers from me, maybe not always those you will like, but you will get answers and they will reflect my honest views. that is the commitment i made to you. i would like to finish by saying a few words about the importance of taking care of the women and men who serve in the cia. because the of the secretiveness that the intelligence work requires, few americans will ever know the making sacrifices that these professionals and their families make every day. many have risked their lives and at times have given their lives to keep our country states. -- safe. i
there's no major catalysts in the market. we got that trade deficit number narrowest in three years. >> good numbers from china. >> if we can believe them. i don't know. depends how you feel about the numbers. still the numbers were there. that was some after what the market was chewing on today. but a low volume day. >> a lot of talk about apple. we're going go after apple in a second. everyone is talking about apple and its excess cash and what's going to happen and this lawsuit from mine einhorn. >> $137 billion dollar of excess cash. that's a lot of cash. should they be returning it to shareholders? einhorn says give it back to us in the form of preferred shares. he's filed this lawsuit. i think it's interesting really that apple even responded. so often you don't heart company say anything when all of this buzz is going around. i don't know what are going to do. i don't know what the right thing is to do. but i know they should make the shareholders feel like it's worth holding that stock. >> i think there's going to be a lot of movement on that. many thanks to cnbc's courtney
washington journal they talk about the recent article suggesting that a trust deficit by americans toward government and financial sector could be holding back the economic recovery. my cartoons depict can da that and humor. why started the cartoon, they were native characters and native situations. and my audience was geared toward natives. in the last four or five years they have become more universal where they stilled to the mainstream dominant culture. it's more universal now. i'm inspired by the people that are that i grew up with. my friend, my family, members of my tribe. and basically watching people and some of the things they do. it's surprising, if you pay attention to what people do and what people say, there's a lot of humor you can find in that, you know, making your own twists and certain things. >> people who have read my cartoons for the first time. i hope they take with them the appreciation of a native culture and native way of life. because it's not always depicted correctly in cinema or in books. but this cartoon coming from a genuine native american and these are my
spending, investments in military power, reinvest it elsewhere. not so much cut the deficit, but use the money saved for his priorities, his domestic priorities. closer? >> yeah. >> okay. >> oh, no, i just want the mic back. closer to me. this is the problem with us having three mics, and i apologize. tom, i just want to push you on a question and then actually segway to fred to talk about the wars we theoretically can fight. part of the problem is the notion that we don't have wars that we want to fight, and that is in some ways an acceptable notion. a man who was elected as commander and chief, and he gets to make those decisions. the american people voted him into office, and in some ways the president is absolutely right to suggest that he has a mandate in these areas. the real question is the impact that these decisions have on the threat environment that the united states is in. for most of history, we don't talk about this very much, we have maintained a strong military not so that we can fight, but so that we cannot fight. and the other point i think that tom made and this is
this week. the ongoing debate over the rising debt and deficit and how to rein in government spending. here is a portion of the address. [video clip] >> i recently voted to present the democratic majority in the u.s. senate with a simple but powerful challenge. pass a budget, or you do not get paid. by forcing senate democrats to finally live up to one of the most basic responsibilities of governing, we are presenting them with a golden opportunity to confront and fall -- solve our spending program. we are holding president obama accountable for the sequestered cuts he first proposed in 2011. republicans want to replace the sequester, which is a series of harmful across the board cuts with better, common-sense cuts and reforms. all of this will require democrats to finally get serious about the spending problem. each of the last two years, the republican-led house has passed a responsible budget that addresses what is driving the debt to put our country on a path to prosperity. unfortunately, it has been for years some senate democrats last pass the budget. 1000, 375 days to be exact. -- 16
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 112 (some duplicates have been removed)